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CAIRNGORMS CRANES

#WildlifeComeback

IMAGINE LIFE-RICH WETLANDS ECHOING TO THE EVOCATIVE CALL OF CRANES

The Eurasian Crane is a charismatic bird found across much of northern Europe and Asia. Before hunting and habitat loss led to their extinction, cranes were plentiful and widespread in Scotland, their evocative bugling synonymous with vast, rich wetlands. In Pictish times, Loch Insh in the Cairngorms was known as Linn Garan, or Crane Lake. For centuries however, Loch Insh has fallen silent.

Cranes made a tentative return to the UK in the 1970's but their spread has been slow and there are presently only a handful of breeding pairs in north-east Scotland. In order to expand their range, we are working with partners and local communities to return cranes to the Cairngorms National Park in parallel with the creation of crane-friendly habitat. 

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WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? 

  • Cranes are part of a complex ecological jigsaw, which over time has lost many of its pieces. Restoring these magnificent wetland birds will enhance ecological completeness and functionality.

  • Restoring Wetlands across the Cairngorms will provide a home for key plants, insects and birds, but will also help reduce the impact of seasonal flooding, which is predicted to become more extreme due to climate breakdown.

  • Cranes are very visible and audible birds and could become a flagship for local communities, enhancing the image of the Cairngorms as a nature-rich landscape, attracting visitors and providing a boost to the local economy

 

It’s time to rewrite the crane’s story.

 

#WildlifeComeback