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CAIRNGORMS CRANES

#WildlifeComeback

IMAGINE EXTENSIVE WETLANDS ECHOING TO THE EVOCATIVE CALLS OF CRANES

The Eurasian Crane is a charismatic bird found across much of northern Europe and Asia. Before hunting and habitat loss wiped them out, cranes were plentiful and widespread in Scotland, their evocative bugling synonymous with vast, rich wetlands.

It is thought that in Pictish times, Loch Insh in the Cairngorms was known as Linn Garan, or Crane Lake. For centuries however, Loch Insh has fallen silent.

Cranes made a tentative return to the UK in the 1970's but their spread has been slow and there are presently only a handful of breeding pairs in Scotland. In order to expand their range, we are working with partners to return cranes to the Cairngorms National Park, not only to enhance the ecological integrity of the landscape, but also to provide a significant social and economic opportunity.

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WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

 

  • Cranes are part of a complex ecological jigsaw, which over time has lost many of its pieces. Ecological completeness and functionality is a primary motivation for their reintroduction.
  • Cranes are very visible and audible birds and would enhance the image of the Cairngorms as a nature-rich landscape, attracting visitors providing a boost to the local economy.
  • The return of cranes would provide educational and social benefits, with schools being involved in the restoration process and a sense of ownership among local communities.
  • Cranes have already been restored to south west England via The Great Crane Project, which provides an excellent template for a reintroduction in Scotland.

 

CALL OF CRANES

It's time to rewrite the crane's story. Together.

 

Help us return cranes to the Cairngorms